10 Top Rated African Songs Of All Time

Africa stands out among other continents, and this is obvious in many areas, from genetic make-up to arts and culture. One of the ways Africa’s uniqueness has been expressed is in her style of music. African music comes in many interesting styles, beats, and costumes according to countries and regions that leaves her audience constantly in awe. Below is a top 10 list.

10. African Queen by Nigerian, 2face Idibia

The song African Queen was released in 2004. It can be described as a song for Africa, as it richly appraises the African woman in a world where African women were once labeled as ugly and inferior. The song totally depicts how much Africa has re-defined the yardstick for measuring beauty. It celebrates the African woman and as such has remained a hit even today.


9. Vuli Ndlela by South African, Brenda Fassie

Vuli Ndlela, a top hit was released in 1999 by late singer Brenda Fassie and remains one of her best songs. The song sure won her several music awards, and despite being sung in her local dialect, it was listened to by Africans all over the world. Even today, people still seek it’s translation on the internet.


8. Malaika by Kenyan Fadhili Williams

Recorded in 1963, the song is among popular African songs that will never be forgotten and one of the greatest songs to have ever been recorded by a Kenyan artist. From the album Lullabies From Mother Africa, “Malaika” is a Swahili word for “Angel,” which is commonly used while referring to a beautiful lady. It was recorded in 1963 by the late Fadhili Williams.

7. Once a Slave by Project Monkz featuring Maulana (Ghanian)

Among many songs of Africa, “Once a Slave” is regarded as one of the greatest African hip-hop songs of all time. The African song is composed to change the Black man’s mentality, as it concerns slavery and the inferiority complex that has persisted from the slavery experience. The song was a collaboration between Project Monkz and Maulana. It was released back in 2006.

6. Mezez Alew by Ethiopian Aster Aweke

From the album Enenoralen Gena, meaning “we shall live,” the song which was released in the late-’90s, celebrates love, loyalty, and interdependence between lovers as well as counsels people to practice safe sex in order to protect themselves from HIV.

5. Zamina Mina Zangalewa by Cameroonian Golden Sounds

“Zamina mina” was a hit song recorded by a popular Cameroonian dance group called “Golden Sounds.” in 1986. The song presently has quite a number of version as it has since been remixed by numerous international artists, including the American/Spanish singer Shakira which she performed during the opening of 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.

4. Coupe Bibamba by Congolese, Awilo Longomba

Coupe Bibamba was released by Awilo Longomba in 1998, it was and is still loved and played all over Africa even today. The song was a major stepping stone for the popular singer who rose to the top of the African music industry after its release.

3. Premiere Gaou by Ivorian, Magic System

Premiere Gaou was released by singer, Magic System in 2002, and has since remained a hit both in Africa and away. It is a song that most can Africans around the world can identify with and has sold millions of copies.

2. Sweet Mother by Nigerian/Cameroonian Prince Nico Mbarga

The song which will later be referred to as “the anthem that unites Africa” was released in 1975 by the talented singer. The evergreen song, which celebrates mothers remains a hit even today as there’s hardly any wedding or mother’s day event where it is not played. It remains one of Africa’s finest songs.

1 Umqombothi by South African Yvonne Chaka Chaka

“Umqombothi (African Beer)” was released in 1988 by one of the celebrated South African pioneer singers Yvonne Chaka Chaka who has recorded numerous hit songs, one of which is “Umqombothi. The song is from the album Yvonne Chaka Chaka, it celebrates an African locally made beer, produced from malt, yeast, maize, and sorghum. 

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